Depopulation already unleashed: Shocking new research finds prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors can impact male fertility for generations

Tuesday, April 17, 2018
By Paul Martin

by: Ethan Huff
NaturalNews.com
Tuesday, April 17, 2018

The long-term negative effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals, or EDCs, extend far beyond just the immediate generation exposed to them, new research has found.

Presented at ENDO 2018, the 100th annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, which took place in Chicago earlier this year, data compiled on EDC exposure revealed that pregnant women exposed to chemicals like bisphenol-A (BPA), a hormone-altering chemical commonly used in plastic containers and thermal receipt paper, passes on from one generation to the next.

The researchers looked specifically at the effects of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is one of the most widely used EDCs. It’s commonly found in industrial and consumer products, including in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) piping and tubing, cosmetics, medical devices, and children’s plastic toys.

Male mice exposed to this chemical were observed to have significantly lower levels of testosterone in their blood, as well as decreased sperm count in their semen. As a result, these mice lost their fertility at a very young age when they should have still been fertile.

“Most surprisingly, the male mice born to male mice that were exposed to DEHP also exhibited similar reproductive abnormalities – indicating prenatal exposure to DEHP can affect the fertility and reproductive capacity of more than one generation of offspring,” stated Radwa Barakat, B.V.S.C., M.Sc., from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

“Therefore, DEHP may be a contributing factor to the decreased sperm counts and qualities in modern men compared to previous generations.” [emphasis added]

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