Bill before congress would authorize secrecy and surveillance, not “cyber security”

Tuesday, April 21, 2015
By Paul Martin

Privacysos.org
04/20/2015

A provision in the falsely-named “cyber security” bill currently being debated in congress would—in addition to enabling more warrantless government spying—create a gaping hole in the Freedom of Information Act, potentially allowing federal agencies to keep secret any information they don’t want made public. The new exemption to FOIA would cover all “information shared with or provided to the Federal Government” through the so-called “cyber security” information sharing program, Politico reports.

Senators Chuck Grassley and Pat Leahy have raised concerns about the provision. Politico quotes Grassley from a 2012 hearing on a similar proposal:

I have to say that I’m a bit surprised that some open government and privacy groups appear to be accepting the dramatic regulatory power that Homeland Security and Secretary Napolitano will have under the Lieberman-Collins’ cybersecurity bill and under President [Barack] Obama’s proposal. Given the FOIA scandal at Homeland Security, I’d have thought that they’d have more reservations.

But open government advocates aren’t accepting the “dramatic regulatory power” the new FOIA exemption would give the executive branch. Politico’s Josh Gerstein interviewed an expert with OpentheGovernment.org, who warned that “the proposed new FOIA exemption could allow companies to block disclosure of virtually any information by anyone in the government simply by submitting that information to the new cybersecurity portal,” he wrote.

The Rest…HERE

Comments are closed.

Join the revolution in 2018. Revolution Radio is 100% volunteer ran. Any contributions are greatly appreciated. God bless!

Follow us on Twitter