The Number One Reason Why the USA Has Been Conquered

Saturday, September 21, 2013
By Paul Martin

Dave Hodges
TheCommonSenseShow.com
September 21, 2013

There are exceptional people out there who are capable of starting epidemics. All you have to do is find them.” ― Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

Our Congress has an all-time low 9% approval rating, and Obama’s popularity is in the toilet. It has been 10 years since I declared war upon the central bankers. In that time, I have watched millions of our fellow countrymen show evidence that they are in various stages of waking up to the tyranny that is attacking every facet of our lives. The alternative media has done a marvelous job of reaching the masses despite being ridiculed and shut out of the mainstream media. The alternative media is being so effective that Congress is attempting to declare us to “not be journalists” in a bill that is in Committee. It is my considered opinion that we have awakened enough people who are collectively capable of making substantial fundamental differences. This begs the obvious question, then why don’t we see a massive revolution against the central bankers and their institutions of control? There is no simple answer which will explain all the fence-sitting we are witnessing in the country today. However, there is one social psychological factor which explains why the majority of the people who are awake to the present level of tyranny are not sufficiently motivated to act and that factor is called bystander apathy.

Bystander Apathy
The term bystander apathy (i.e. fence sitting) refers to the phenomenon in which the greater the number of people present, the less likely people are to help a person in distress. When an emergency situation occurs, observers are more likely to take action if there are few or no other witnesses.

The most frequently cited example of the bystander effect in introductory psychology textbooks is the brutal murder of a young woman named Catherine “Kitty” Genovese. On Friday, March 13, 1964, 28-year-old Genovese was returning home from work. While Genvovese approached her apartment entrance, she was attacked and repeatedly stabbed by a man later identified as Winston Moseley.

Despite Genovese’s repeated calls for help, none of the dozen people in the nearby apartment building who heard her cries called the police. The attack first began at 3:20 AM, but it was not until 3:50 AM that someone first contacted police. Genovese’s death was preventable and the failure of her neighbors to report the crime in progress, brought the social psychology term, bystander apathy, into the national discussion about people’s unwillingness to act in an emergency situation.

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