Suitcase sized device can remotely disable phones, intercept communications, record unique IDs and track you in real time

Wednesday, November 2, 2011
By Paul Martin

By Madison Ruppert
BlackListedNews.com
November 2, 2011

Governments around the world are increasingly taking control of civilian communications – especially cellular telephone networks – usually for nefarious purposes.

We have seen just this occur in the Middle East on multiple occasions during the so-called Arab Spring and now these control systems are being implemented in full force in the West as well.

This is not just dangerous because having government creep into the private lives of citizens usually turns out poorly but because this type of technology enables horrific atrocities.

One type of system is produced by Datong in the United Kingdom which has already been purchased by the largest police force in all of Britain, the London Metropolitan Police.

The London Police paid $230,000 for so called “ICT hardware” in 2008 and 2009 which creates a fake cellular phone network in order to not only intercept the communications and unique identification numbers from phones, but also to remotely turn off telephones.

This incredibly dangerous technology that seems like something out of a spy thriller is highly portable and is about the size of a suitcase.

This means that at a protest in which a brutal government crackdown is about to occur, all that the police would need to do is turn on their suitcase device and suddenly no one is able to record the incident on their phone or call for help.

The device can intercept SMS (text) messages, telephone calls, and even the unique IMSI and IMEI identifiers which would then allow police to track the telephone user’s movements in real time, which totally bypasses the need to request location data from the carrier itself as is normally required, according to Wired’s Threat Level.

The device can also completely prevent outbound communications from reaching a cell tower “for crowd control during demonstrations and riots where participants use phones to organize.”

The Rest…HERE

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