FORBIDDEN GATES-PART 23

Friday, December 3, 2010
By Paul Martin

By Thomas R. Horn
December 3, 2010
NewsWithViews.com

WILL YOU G.R.I.N. FOR THE MARK OF THE BEAST?

Can a microscopic tag be implanted in a person’s body to track his every movement? There’s actual discussion about that. You will rule on that—mark my words—before your tenure is over. —U.S. Sen. Joseph Biden, asked during Senate Judiciary Committee hearings on the nomination of John Roberts to be chief justice of the Supreme Court

Although microchip implantation might be introduced as a voluntary procedure, in time, there will be pressure to make it mandatory. A national identification system via microchip implants could be achieved in two stages. Upon introduction as a voluntary system, the microchip implantation will appear to be palatable. After there is a familiarity with the procedure and a knowledge of its benefits, implantation would be mandatory. —Dr. Elaine M. Ramesh, patent attorney for Franklin Pierce Law Center

Now imagine a world in which every newborn baby immediately has a little capsule implanted under his armpit. Inside are monitors, tiny amounts of hormones, a wireless transmitter and receiver…. From birth, no moment in a person’s life will go unmonitored. —Joseph Farah, Whistleblower magazine

Unless you’ve been hidden under a rock for the past twenty years, you are probably familiar with the development of radio-frequency identification (rfid) technology that under certain applications is forecast to be connected to future Grin technologies, especially neurosciences, brain-machine interfacing, and cybernetics.

RFID chips employ tiny integrated circuits for storing and processing information using an antenna for receiving and transmitting the related data. This technology is most commonly applied as a “tag” for tracking inventory with radio waves at companies like Walmart, where consumer goods are embedded with “smart tags” that are read by hand-held scanners for supply chain management.

In recent years, rfid technology has been expanding within public and private firms as a method for verifying and tracking people as well. We first became aware of this trend a while back when chief of police Jack Schmidig of Bergen County, New Jersey, a member of the police force for more than thirty years, received a VeriChip (rfid chip) implant as part of Applied Digital Solution’s strategy of enlisting key regional leaders to accelerate adoption of its product.

The Rest…HERE

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