20 Dead From Plague in Madagascar: Chances of International Spread Increasing

Thursday, December 12, 2013
By Paul Martin

Chris Carrington
The Daily Sheeple
December 12th, 2013

The Guardian is reporting that since October, 20 people have died in Madagascar from bubonic plague. Madagascar is the ‘plague capital’ of the world with about 60 deaths a year from the disease.

From the Guardian:

The Pasteur Institute of Madagascar revealed on Tuesday that tests taken from bodies in the village last week showed that they had died of bubonic plague. The institute added it was concerned the disease could spread to towns and cities where living standards have declined since a coup in 2009.

The deaths are doubly concerning because the outbreak occurred both outside the island’s normal plague season, which runs from July to October, and apparently at a far lower elevation than usual.

Bubonic plague (Yersinia pestis) is spread by the fleas from black rats, Xenopsylla cheopis. Black rats are known by various names. Ship rat, roof rat, house rat, Alexandrine rat and old English rat are all names commonly used to describe Rattus rattus, the black rat.

The Rest…HERE

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