Politicians Get Away with Systematic Theft by Fostering Fiscal Euphemisms

Monday, September 13, 2010
By Paul Martin

By: Robert Murphy
Market Oracle
Sep 13, 2010

One of the ways politicians get away with systematic theft is by fostering euphemisms to describe their activities. Murray Rothbard pointed out some of the typical tricks. More recently, even the supposedly “right-of-center” economists Greg Mankiw and Martin Feldstein do their part to muddy the terminological waters, making it harder for the public to understand just how much they’re getting ripped off.

Rothbard’s Critique of Fiscal Euphemisms
In his splendid collection Making Economic Sense, Rothbard has an essay on “Creative Economic Semantics.” He writes,

If the federal government’s economists have been good for nothing else in recent years, they have made great strides in what might be called “creative economic semantics.” First they redefined the seemingly simple term “budget cut.” In the old days, a “budget cut” was a reduction of next year’s budget below this year’s. In that old-fashioned sense, Dwight Eisenhower’s first two years in office actually cut the budget substantially … below the previous year. Now we have “budget cuts” which are not cuts, but rather substantial increases over the previous year’s expenditures.

“Cut” became subtly but crucially redefined as reducing something else. What the something else might be didn’t seem to matter, so long as the focus was taken off actual dollar expenditures. Sometimes it was a cut “in the rate of increase,” other times it was a cut in “real” spending, at still others it was a percentage of GNP, and at yet other times it was a cut in the sense of being below past projections for that year.

The result of a series of such “cuts” has been to raise spending sharply and dramatically not only in old-fashioned terms, but even in all other categories. Government spending has gone up considerably any way you slice it. As a result, even the idea of a creatively semantic budget cut has not gone the way of the nickel fare and the Constitution of the United States.

Rothbard goes on to say that the “creative semantics” applied not just to government spending but also to taxes:

The Rest…HERE

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