JFK, MLK, RFK, 50 Years of Suppressed History: New Evidence on Assassination of John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy.

Friday, April 5, 2013
By Paul Martin

Failures to Confront the Unspeakable, and The Way Ahead. Part I

By Elizabeth Woodworth
Global Research
April 05, 2013

In the last 50 years there have been two major threats to life on our planet. The first, the nuclear arms race and its near disaster of 1962, was narrowly averted by President John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert Kennedy, who then set a course for peace.

The second, the ticking climate bomb on its short “business as usual” fuse, has no solution in sight. (PART II of this essay forthcoming)

In both cases unseen forces have blocked a survival response to incalculable danger. We will examine these forces and suggest a way forward, modeled partially on action taken by JFK to avert nuclear war.

Mind is the Master power that moulds and makes,
And Man is Mind, and evermore he takes
The tool of Thought, and, shaping what he wills,
Brings forth a thousand joys, a thousand ills: —
He thinks in secret, and it comes to pass:
Environment is but his looking-glass.

James Allen,1902

I. Introduction

Most people under 60 will not remember the harrowing Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, when the world was brought to the brink of nuclear war. With the US leading the long-range missile race, short-range Soviet missiles had been quietly installed in Cuba. Tension ignited when a US reconnaissance pilot was shot down over Cuba and killed. Kennedy, opposed to a war with Cuba, feared that his generals would overthrow him and escalate the crisis to a nuclear war that they believed to be winnable.

In desperation Kennedy turned to urgent, secret negotiations with his Cold War enemy, Premier Nikita Khrushchev. Disaster was narrowly averted through the vital historical meeting of October 27.[1]

Horrified by the event and under pressure from senior advisors to pursue a first-strike capability,[2] Kennedy made a decisive turn towards peace. He began urging the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and withdrawal from Viet Nam.

In June, 1963 he made an impassioned plea at the American University to make peace with the Soviets: “If we cannot end now our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity. In the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s futures. And we are all mortal.”[3]

But he would not be long for this world, for he had bitterly alienated the hawks who placed “winning the Cold War” above the life of a President.

JFK’s November, 1963 assassination unleashed nuclear roulette[4] to swagger and bluff its way into the eighties, obstructing his vision for peace while the planet hung in the balance.

The Rest…HERE

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