2013 version of NDAA makes it even easier to indefinitely detain Americans without charge or trial

Friday, November 30, 2012
By Paul Martin

By Madison Ruppert
End the Lie.com

Unfortunately, it looks like the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2013 makes it even easier for the U.S. government to indefinitely detain American citizens without charge or trial.

Despite the many claims that Americans in fact could not be indefinitely detained under the 2012 version of the NDAA, a federal judge stated in court that Americans could be held indefinitely under the act earlier this year and ruled the provisions unconstitutional, a ruling which was quickly reversed by a judge appointed by Obama.

Some news outlets were falsely reporting that the new NDAA actually did more to protect the rights of Americans, but upon further scrutiny, they retracted the statements and indeed concluded that the new NDAA makes it easier for the government to detain U.S. citizens indefinitely.

The misleading passage, found in Section 1033, states:

Nothing in the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note) or the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81) shall be construed to deny the availability of the writ of habeas corpus or to deny any Constitutional rights in a court ordained or established by or under Article III of the Constitution for any person who is lawfully in the United States when detained pursuant to the Authorization for Use of Military Force (Public Law 107-40; 50 U.S.C. 1541 note) and who is otherwise entitled to the availability of such writ or such rights.

The Rest…HERE

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