First Spanish Bailouts Conditions Revealed: Pension Freeze, Retirement Age Hike

Friday, September 21, 2012
By Paul Martin

by Tyler Durden
ZeroHedge.com
09/21/2012

As we reported first thing this morning, Spain, while happy to receive the effect of plunging bond yields, most certainly does not want the cause – requesting the inevitable sovereign bailout. To paraphrase Italy’s undersecretary of finance, Gianfranco Polillo: “There won’t be any nation that voluntarily, with a preemptive move, even if rationally justified, would go to an international body and say — ‘I give up my national sovereignty.” He is spot on. However, the one thing that will force countries to request a bailout is the inevitable outcome of soaring budget deficits: i.e., running out of cash (as calculated here previously, an event Spain has to certainly look forward to all else equal). Which simply means that sooner or later Mariano Rajoy will have to throw in the towel and push the red button, knowing full well it most certainly means the end of his administration, and very likely substantial social and political unrest for a country which already has 25% unemployment, all just to preserve the ability to fund its deficits, instead of biting the bullet and slashing public spending (and funding needs), which too would cause social unrest – hence no way out. But why would a bailout request result in unrest? Reuters finally brings us the details of what the Spanish bailout would entail, and they are not pretty: “Spain is considering freezing pensions and speeding up a planned rise in the retirement age as it races to cut spending and meet conditions of an expected international sovereign aid package, sources with knowledge of the matter said…The accelerated raising of the retirement age to 67 from 65, currently scheduled to take place over 15 years, is a done deal, the sources said. The elimination of an inflation-linked annual pension hike is still being considered.”

The Rest…HERE

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