6.8 magnitude earthquake strikes off the coast of Papua New Guinea

Tuesday, April 17, 2012
By Paul Martin

TheExtinctionProtocol.com
April 17, 2012

PAPUA NEW GUINEA – A 6.8-magnitude quake struck off the northeast of Papua New Guinea on Tuesday, the U.S. Geological Survey said, but there was no tsunami warning issued. The quake hit at 5:13 pm (0713 GMT) 141 kilometers (88 miles) north of the country’s second largest city of Lae and 443 kilometers from the capital Port Moresby at a depth of 201 kilometers, it said. “A destructive tsunami was not generated based on earthquake and historical tsunami data,” the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said in a statement. Geoscience Australia measured the quake at 6.8 magnitude and at a depth of 215 kilometers but agreed it was unlikely to generate dangerous waves in the developing Pacific island nation. “It’s pretty deep so it’s not a tsunami threat we believe, even though it’s slightly offshore,” Geoscience Australia seismologist Clive Collins told AFP. The USGS also put the earthquake a 6.8 magnitude. Collins said there had been reports of the quake being felt as far away as Goroko, a highland region about 250 kilometers from the epicenter. “There would be quite some shaking to the areas close by… because it’s about 20 kilometers offshore,” Collins said. “So it’s obviously been felt in a wide area around Papua New Guinea, which you would expect from something that big.” Quakes of such magnitude are common in impoverished PNG, which sits on the so-called “Pacific Ring of Fire,” a hotspot for seismic activity due to friction between tectonic plates.”That northern part of Papua New Guinea is subject to quite strong earthquakes reasonably frequently,” Collins said, adding that the biggest risk in the mountainous country was generally from landslips caused by tremors. –Daily Star

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