Europe Leaks It Will Fix Crushing Debt Problem With €940 Billion Of More EFSFESM Debt

Wednesday, March 28, 2012
By Paul Martin

by Tyler Durden
ZeroHedge.com
03/28/2012

We were delighted to see that the old headline scanning algos are still in charge of the FX market following “news”, which were not even news, having been expected by absolutely everyone, that the EU is about to propose an expansion of Europe’s bailout fund to a total of €940 billion for one year, by merging the €440 billion EFSF and €500 billion ESM – leading to a very transitory spike in the EURUSD. From Bloomberg: “European governments are preparing for a one-year increase in the ceiling on rescue aid to 940 billion euros ($1.3 trillion) to keep the debt crisis at bay, according to a draft statement written for finance ministers. The euro-area finance chiefs will probably decide at a meeting in Copenhagen March 30 to run the 500 billion-euro permanent European Stability Mechanism alongside the 200 billion euros committed by the temporary fund, a European official told reporters earlier today in Brussels. Beyond that, they are also set to allow the temporary fund’s unused 240 billion euros to be tapped until mid-2013 “in exceptional circumstances following a unanimous decision of euro-area heads of state or government notably in case the ESM capacity would prove insufficient,” according to the draft dated March 23 and obtained by Bloomberg News.” Three things here: 1) Of the bombastic €940 billion in headline bailout money, only €300 billion or so will actually be available (sorry PIIGS – you can’t bail out the PIIGS, also a third of the EFSF money is already tied up); 2) Europe is already preparing for the fade of the impact of the LTRO, which as pointed out earlier, has not only peaked, but courtesy of the LTRO stigma, which we suggested months ago to trade by going long non-LTRO banks and shorting-LTRO recipients, is starting to hurt all those firms who thought, foolishly, that the market would not go after them. They were wrong. And now Draghi is also boxed in an runaway inflation corner. And 3) Europe is back to the old mode of thinking that more debt will fix debt, even as the banking sector is forced to delever ahead of Basel III and due to shareholder requirements. This simply means that the eye of the hurricane over Europe’s sovereign debt is about to pass. Those who miss 7% yields on BTPs won’t have long to wait. Reality is once again starting to reassert itself.

More from Bloomberg on Europe’s reversion to desperation.

The Rest…HERE

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