Curling Up In a Ball to Avoid Police Violence May Be Considered “Active Resistance”

Monday, November 21, 2011
By Paul Martin

Justifying the Use of MORE FORCE, Including Baton Strikes

Washington’s Blog
November 21, 2011

In a Police State Like Modern America, Even Peaceful Resistance Is Considered Violence and Cause for Even More Brutality

As I’ve repeatedly documented, passive resistance is considered “violence” and aggression in today’s militarized police state.

For example, protesters peacefully linking arms is considered “violence” by the UC Berkeley police. And failing to get on the ground is grounds to beat a peaceful war hero so bad that his spleen is ruptured (and then denying him medical treatment for 18 hours).

Of course pregnant women, old ladies, judges, legal observers (and see this), reporters , veterans andskinny students are all scary and violent enemies who need to be beaten into submission.

And as AP reports today – in relation to the pepper spraying of peaceful UC Davis students:

Charles J. Kelly, a former Baltimore Police Department lieutenant who wrote the department’s use of force guidelines, said … After reviewing the video [of the pepper spraying of UC Davis students] he observed at least two cases of “active resistance” from protesters. In one instance, a woman pulls her arm back from an officer. In the second instance, a protester curls into a ball. Each of those actions could have warranted more force, including baton strikes and pressure-point techniques.
“What I’m looking at is fairly standard police procedure,” Kelly said.

The Rest…HERE

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