Ministries Working Overtime For Antichrist: Demons Of Dominionism Hope You Never Understand Their Gospel Killing Occultism Or Discover The Church’s True Source Of Spiritual Power (Preaching The Gospel)

Friday, June 18, 2010
By Paul Martin

Discernment Nazis

By Derek Gilbert
HearkenTheWatchMen.com

When professing Christians accuse other believers of being Communist sympathizers, Nazi collaborators, or—even worse—closet members of the ACLU, something is seriously wrong in Christendom.

Janet Porter, head of the activist group Faith2Action, did just that last week, taking aim at Discernment Ministries1 for its ongoing criticism of Dominion theology. In a series of articles dating back more than five years, Discernment Ministries has shown how and where Dominionism deviates from scripture. A series of articles this spring have focused on the Dominionist agenda of May Day 2010, an event organized by Porter and endorsed by a who’s who of the religious right.

In response, Mrs. Porter suggested that Christians who oppose using political means to address our spiritual problems need to “come out of the closet” (interesting choice of phrase) and “spend more time reading the Bible”.

In other words, Mrs. Porter appears to believe that the only effective response to moral decay—i.e., sin—is organizing powerful political action committees.

The May Day event was a classic example of Dominion theology. I’ve gone into this in depth elsewhere, but I’ll point out again that the event was organized into seven hours of prayer, one for each of the so-called seven mountains of culture. Dominionists believe Christians must reclaim those seven mountains to retake the world because Christ won’t come back until we do.

That belief is not only unbiblical, it’s downright heretical.

The reason for Mrs. Porter’s anger is obvious. VCY America, the main distributor of her daily radio program, dropped her show after May Day. According to a statement by the network, Porter continued to promote a Dominionist agenda in spite of its objections on scriptural grounds. Several prominent “apostles” and “prophets” from the International Coalition of Apostles, the principal promoter of the Dominionist “seven mountain mandate”, were center stage at May Day 2010. Porter’s show appears to be on hiatus as of this writing.

While we share Mrs. Porter’s disgust at our nation’s descent into darkness, the answer is not in a ballot box—or rather, the approach is not to work from the ballot box backward. If the American public truly wanted an end to abortion, pornography, drug abuse, and other manifestations of the evil that lurks in the hearts of men, these things would cease to be. Look, we don’t have legalized abortion because Christians failed to vote; tens of millions of babies have died because tens of millions of Americans reserved the right to kill them.

The problem is not political. It’s spiritual.

God tells us that simply desiring to commit an act, whether through hatred or lust or envy or greed, is the same as committing the sin itself. Not like the sin; it is the sin.

So how would forcing a law on an unwilling public, say a ban on pornography, be pleasing to God? Would hearts be changed? Would the desire to sin disappear when the president signed the bill? Would a civil penalty be an effective deterrent to sin where an eternal, supernatural judgment has failed?

And how would such a law be enforced without a ruling class of politician/priests backed by a well-armed police force?

The danger of mixing religion and politics should be especially clear to Americans. The Pilgrims who landed at Massachusetts Bay in 1622 were fleeing a head of state who was also the head of the church. So yes, Mrs. Porter, separating church and state is a good idea. For the church.

Christians who cheered faith-based initiatives under President Bush must now watch as President Obama uses that office to push a globalist climate change agenda on American churches. Christians who object to this turnabout can’t complain from the pulpit or they risk losing tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.

The state giveth and the state taketh away.

The pulpit is where we need to look for answers. Just as in the days of the prophet Hosea, when the Lord lamented, “My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge,” American Christians have doomed the culture through ignorance. We don’t know enough about why we believe to convince anyone else why they should.

How do you know the Bible is true—that it hasn’t been edited, amended, and rewritten every few centuries to serve the political aims of kings and kingdoms? If you don’t know, how can you persuade anyone to believe that the Word of God is, in fact, the Word of God?

It starts with our pastors. If George Barna’s 2004 survey was correct, only 51% of Protestant pastors in America have a biblical worldview, defined as a belief in absolute moral truth as defined by scripture and acceptance of six core biblical beliefs: the accuracy of biblical teaching, the sinless nature of Jesus, the literal existence of Satan, the omnipotence and omniscience of God, salvation by grace alone, and the personal responsibility to evangelize.2

If our pastors don’t believe the Bible contains absolute moral truth, why should we? No wonder 21st century America is as much Oprah, Rush, and Dr. Phil as it is Christ and Him crucified!

And if a nation rejects biblical morality—which ours has—then it can only be imposed through the power of the state.

That accomplishes absolutely nothing spiritually, and it will inevitably result, as leading “new apostle” Rick Joyner admits, in a “kingdom of God” that looks a lot like a dictatorship3.

Worse, those who build this dictatorship may realize, too late, that the one who rises to rule it is not the One they’ve been waiting for.

1http://herescope.blogspot.com/
2http://www.crosswalk.com/1240810/
3http://herescope.blogspot.com/2007/06/dominion-at-first-it-may-seem-like.html

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