Globalists Plan to Stay in Afghanistan Forever

Saturday, August 20, 2011
By Paul Martin

Kurt Nimmo
Infowars.com
August 20, 2011

Ben Farmer, writing for The Telegraph on Friday, reported that the U.S. and Afghanistan have reached an agreement that would allow American special forces and air force to remain in the country until 2024. The agreement arrives as the United States claims it will pack up and leave by the end of 2014.

In December of 2009, during a speech delivered at West Point, Obama said troops would begin leaving Afghanistan. Prior to the speech, the Pentagon said it would send an additional 30,000 troops as part of a “mini-surge.” NATO was asked to send between 5,000 and 10,000 troops as part of an international force. In early 2010, the Pentagon increased substantially its “new civilian forces” outside of Kabul, according to ABC News.
Afghanistan’s hand-picked president, Hamid Karzai, confirmed earlier this year that the United States plans to establish permanent bases in his country. “Yes they want this (permanent bases) and we have been negotiating with them,” Karzai said at a press conference in his presidential palace in February. “We believe that a long-term relationship with the United States is in the interest of Afghanistan.”
The deal was negotiated without the participation or approval of the Afghan parliament or the grand tribal council known as the Loya Jirga.
The plan announced last week was peddled as part of the effort to train the Afghan military and police. “If [the Americans] provide us weapons and equipment, they need facilities to bring that equipment,” said Rangin Dadfar Spanta, Karzai’s top security adviser. “If they train our police and soldiers, then those trainers will not be 10 or 20, they will be thousands.”
The continued U.S. presence at numerous bases in Afghanistan is central to the generational war planned to fight against so-called international terrorism, itself a creation of U.S. and British intelligence. “We know we will be confronted with international terrorists. 2014, is not the end of international terrorist networks and we have a common commitment to fight them. For this purpose also, the US needs facilities,” said Spanta.
Andrey Avetisyan, Russian ambassador to Kabul, told The Telegraph permanent U.S. bases should not be required. “I don’t understand why such bases are needed. If the job is done, if terrorism is defeated and peace and stability is brought back, then why would you need bases?” he asked. “If the job is not done, then several thousand troops, even special forces, will not be able to do the job that 150,000 troops couldn’t do. It is not possible.”

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