Will The Antichrist’s ‘Mark’ Be Rolled Out In The United States This Year? The “9/10/11 Project” Progress Toward Universal Biometric Identification System

Sunday, May 15, 2011
By Paul Martin

HomeLandCouncil.org

Gilbert Thompson was an employee of the U.S. Geological Survey who, well over a century ago, found himself working in the wilds of New Mexico. On August 8, 1882, he had occasion to write and put into the mail an order to pay another man the sum of “seventy five dollars.” He identified the payee in that draft as “Lying Bob.” Not trusting that his signature would be sufficient proof that he (Thompson) was who he said he was, or perhaps worried that “Lying Bob” might alter the dollar amount of the draft, Thompson pressed his ink smudged thumb onto the document. Then, within that thumbprint, he carefully wrote in the figure “$75.00.” It’s the first known use of a biometric in the United States for purposes of fraud prevention.

Biometrics refers to the capture of one or more aspects of a person’s physical characteristics that are unique to that individual and thus can be used as a reliable identifier. By that definition, an ordinary mug shot – a photograph of the face, which was possible as early as the 1830s -qualifies as a biometric. Except for mug shots, however, it was the matching of fingerprints that became a de rigueur tool of law-enforcement in the early twentieth century. Fingerprints, until fairly recently, were just that – fingerprints. The term biometrics did not come into wide use until more exotic modes of capturing unique physical identifiers – DNA identification, iris scans, vein-pattern scans, voice identification, face recognition, and others -started coming on line. In this monograph, we briefly trace the recent explosive growth of the use of biometrics in government and the more tentative but increasing use of biometrics in industry. We detail some of the key drivers of that growth, and we examine the state of the art and how the partnership of government and private industry works to bring more biometrics tools into the field.

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