Testimony from Japan: “A Ship with no Captain”. Evolving Coverup of a Nuclear Disaster…

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
By Paul Martin

by Richard Wilcox
Global Research
April 13, 2011

Earthquake and Nuke Fatigue: “Time For The Rich To Leave Tokyo”

It appears there is a cover-up as to the severity of the Fukushima nuclear power plant disaster. We in Japan are being told by the government that there is a plan to monitor food safety to ensure the public will not be exposed to dangerous levels of radiation. Yet some experts dispute whether there is any such thing as a “safe dose.” Further, the government is not honestly telling the public the extent of the problem or how they propose to resolve it (see this rolling update from a resident living near the Fukushima plant: http://candobetter.net/node/2428 ).

Any intelligent layperson who considers the technical aspects of the disaster will be at a loss as to how the plant operators will be able to restore the cooling system, which may be badly damaged, to reactors that themselves may be unrepairable or in various states of melt-down. If the nuclear fuel in the reactors has melted through to the floor, what would be the point of setting up a cooling system to a dysfunctional reactor and a pool of melted fuel?

No one in the government clearly answers these questions nor has the international community come forth with a possible solution.

Is this a case of a ship with no captain?

Greenpeace Japan has been warning the government for weeks that the evacuation zone around the plant does not adequately cover those who are in danger from radiation, especially northwest of the plant. The government finally decided to widen the evacuation zone and recently upgraded the crisis level from 5 to 7, the highest rating that can be given. Japan’s Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency “says the damaged facilities have been releasing a massive amount of radioactive substances, which are posing a threat to human health and the environment over a wide area.”

Having been an inhabitant of Tokyo, Japan for twenty years I can say that things are now very different in the world’s most densely populated city.

After the massive earthquake, tsunami and dozens of large aftershocks, and the 25 million tons of debris created in the north eastern part of the country, it is apparent that the Japanese are suffering from “earthquake fatigue.” Upwards to 30,000 people may have been killed with over 240,000 evacuees which includes 80,000 due to the nuclear crisis.

The Rest…HERE

Leave a Reply