Where Is America’s Gold?: The Mystery of Ft. Knox

Thursday, April 7, 2011
By Paul Martin

by Chris Weber
LewRockwell.com

What Do They Have to Hide?

In a few months we’ll “celebrate” the 40th anniversary of the day when the US Government declared bankruptcy. Oh, they didn’t call it that at the time. But what happened on August 15, 1971 was that the US defaulted on its promise to pay gold for dollars. It is now clear that they didn’t have very much gold left to pay.

My new book, Good As Gold? is now available. I’ve tried to make it a clear and readable history of what happened to the gold confiscated from Americans and put into Fort Knox in the 1930s. I’ve used the government’s own words and statements to paint a picture I think is shocking. There has never been an accounting of this gold. There has never been a real audit of it. (I know people say there was one in 1953, but after reading my book, I wonder if anyone really can believe this.)

At every turn when the government was asked to provide proof of either the amount of gold they have left, or the quality of it, they have answered with lies and evasions. They have been acting like they have something to hide.

What we do know is that until August 15, 1971 any foreign central bank could go to the US Treasury and buy official US gold at $35 per ounce. It was the last link to the international gold standard. Before then, all currencies were defined in terms of the US dollar, and the US dollar was defined in terms of gold. A dollar equaled 1/35th of an ounce of gold; $35 equaled one troy ounce of gold.

But on that day the gold window closed. Since then, no more US government gold has been exchanged for US paper money. In my book, I uncover a 1975 letter from the Washington DC director of the General Accounting Office. Quoting US Treasury sources, the GAO director pretty much comes out and says that there was almost no more “good delivery” gold left. This means that the gold that would be acceptable on international markets and have a purity of .995 or better was almost gone by the time Nixon closed the gold window. They knew that there was almost nothing left that was of a purity acceptable to foreign central banks.

The Rest…HERE

Leave a Reply