Americans Are Just As Likely to Get Struck By Lightning Than Killed By Terrorists

Monday, January 24, 2011
By Paul Martin

Which is why Homeland Security’s anti-American tattle-tale program is about political persecution, not genuine safety

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet.com
Monday, January 24, 2011

News that an alleged suicide bomber killed 31 people and injured over a hundred after an explosion at Russia’s biggest airport is sure to provide the establishment media and governments in the west with more grist through which to sell their fearmongering agenda, when in reality, Americans are just as likely to be killed by peanut allergies, accident-causing deer, and lightning strikes than they are by terrorists.

Roughly the same number as those unfortunately killed in today’s suicide bombing will die on America’s roads today, as well as tomorrow and in fact every day of the year – an average of 115 Americans are killed in car accidents daily, about one every 13 minutes, but you will never see it make the national headlines never mind gain global attention.

And why is that? Because every time we climb into our cars we subconsciously accept the price of freedom – which is the chance of being injured or killed. We take the same gamble every time we board an airplane, cascade down a ski slope or go up in a hot air balloon. We do so because the benefits of being a free human being are infinitely more rewarding than living in constant fear and demanding omnipresent “security,” which is never achievable anyway.

Despite the constant drumbeat of establishment fearmongering about the imminent threat of terrorist attacks, the likelihood of actually being a victim of one is infinitesimally small, and only highlights how such threats are hyperbolically exaggerated for political purposes.

To equal the danger that Americans place themselves in every day by driving their car down the highway, there would have to be a September 11 every month. To reach the same level of risk that one undertakes in boarding an airline, you only have to travel eleven miles in a car.

“Until 2001, far fewer Americans were killed in any grouping of years by all forms of international terrorism than were killed by lightning, and almost none of those terrorist deaths occurred within the United States itself. Even with the September 11 attacks included in the count, the number of Americans killed by international terrorism since the late 1960s (which is when the State Department began counting) is about the same as the number of Americans killed over the same period by lightning, accident-causing deer, or severe allergic reaction to peanuts,” writes Ohio University’s John Mueller in a report entitled A False Sense Of Insecurity.

The Rest…HERE

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