Corruption: Palm Beach County Likely Won’t Make Recount Deadline In Florida Governor, Senate Races

Monday, November 12, 2018
By Paul Martin

The Democrats are mad for power, and they will do anything, anything at all, to get it. After election fraud, watch for even more violence.

PAMELA GELLER
FREEDOMOUTPOST.COM
NOVEMBER 12, 2018

Unbelievable. The corruption is open, brazen, blatant, and off the charts, and the enemedia, of course, is acting as if it’s all business as usual and even claiming that Republican charges of election fraud have been “debunked,” since the fraud is giving them what they want.

But Rick Scott is obviously right: Bill Nelson — and Andrew Gillum as well — is clearly trying to steal the election, as Democrats move to overturn the will of the people also in Arizona, Georgia, California, and elsewhere.

The Democrats are mad for power, and they will do anything, anything at all, to get it.

After election fraud, watch for even more violence.

“Dem-leaning Palm Beach County says it likely won’t make recount deadline in Florida governor, Senate races,” by Gregg Re and Samuel Chamberlain, Fox News, November 11, 2018 (thanks to Mark):

The supervisor of elections in Florida’s heavily Democratic Palm Beach County said Sunday that she did not believe her department would meet a Thursday deadline to complete recounts in the Sunshine State’s historically tight gubernatorial and Senate races, threatening to further confuse an increasingly chaotic and politically fraught process.

The supervisor, Susan Bucher, told reporters that she did not expect to meet the deadline due to aging equipment. Florida Department of State spokeswoman Sarah Revell told Fox News that under state law, if a county does not submit their results by the deadline, then the results on file at the time take their place. Revell added that Florida’s Secretary of State has no authority to grant extensions.

“Supervisors of Elections are independent officials and they are responsible for deciding when to upgrade or modernize their equipment,” Revell added.

The recount in most other major population centers, including Miami-Dade and Pinellas and Hillsborough counties in the Tampa Bay area, were taking place without incident on Sunday. Smaller counties are expected to begin their reviews Monday, Tuesday or Wednesday.

Bucher spoke hours after the campaign of Republican Senate candidate Rick Scott — which secured an early legal victory against Democratic-leaning Broward County officials over the weekend — went back to court with a fresh salvo of emergency complaints against both Broward and Palm Beach counties. One complaint requests that state sheriff’s officers “impound and secure all voting machines, tallying devices and ballots when they are not in use until the conclusion of the recount.”

In a separate lawsuit, Scott’s team is asking a judge to throw out votes tallied by the Broward County Canvassing Board after Saturday’s noon deadline, in apparent violation of state law, which requires that “[t]he canvassing board shall submit … unofficial returns to the Department of State for each federal, statewide, state, or multicounty office or ballot measure no later than … noon on the fourth day after any general or other election.”

“The Broward and Palm Beach County Supervisors of Elections has already demonstrated a blatant disregard for Florida’s elections laws, making it more important than ever that we continue to do everything possible to prevent fraud and ensure this recount is operated responsibly,” Chris Hartline, a Scott spokesman, said in a statement.

Lawyer Marc Elias, who is representing the campaign of Democratic incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson, fired back on Twitter.

“Lets [sic] be clear about what we are witnessing in Florida,” Elias wrote. “The sitting Governor is seeking to throw out lawful votes and seize the voting equipment in order to win an election.”

“Somebody needs to cut down on the Red Bull,” a Scott spokesperson wrote on Twitter, in response to a statement by Florida Democrats Executive Director Juan Penalosa that compared Scott to a Latin American dictator. “We requested that ballots and voting machines be protected when not in use. The only reason not to protect the integrity of the ballots and the voting machines is if you are actively promoting or hoping for fraud.”

But Democrats continued to bash the Republican’s effort. “If Rick Scott wanted to make sure every legal ballot is counted, he would not be suing to try and stop voters from having their legal ballot counted as intended,” Nelson said in a statement. “He’s doing this for the same reason he’s been making false and panicked claims about voter fraud — he’s worried that when all the votes are counted he’ll lose this election. We will not allow him to undermine the democratic process and will use every legal tool available to protect the rights of Florida voters.”

Unofficial results show that Republican former Rep. Ron DeSantis led Democratic Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum by 0.41 percentage points in the election for governor. In the Senate race, Scott’s lead over Nelson is 0.14 percentage points. State law requires a machine recount in races where the margin is less than 0.5 percentage points. Once completed, if the differences in any of the races are 0.25 percentage points or below, a hand recount will be ordered.

The litigation threw yet another wrench in an increasingly chaotic process reminiscent of the 2000 presidential election recount fiasco. In Broward County, the scheduled start of the recount was delayed Sunday because of a problem with one of the tabulation machines. The Republican Party accused Broward’s supervisor of elections, Brenda Snipes, of continuing to compromise the process with “incompetence and gross mismanagement” following the delay, which was resolved within two hours.
Election workers place ballots into electronic counting machines, Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, at the Broward Supervisor of Elections office in Lauderhill, Fla. The Florida recount began Sunday morning in Broward County. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Election workers place ballots into electronic counting machines, Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, at the Broward Supervisor of Elections office in Lauderhill, Fla. The Florida recount began Sunday morning in Broward County. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Broward County election planning director Joe D’Alessandro told Fox News that machines in Broward are currently resorting some 3.5 million pages of ballots, and officials said that process could take more than 30 hours alone before any actual counting begins.

Broward County, the state’s second-most populous, is emerging as the epicenter of controversy in the recount. Broward officials said they mistakenly counted 22 absentee ballots that had been rejected, mostly because the signature on the return envelope did not match the one on file.
Brenda Snipes, Broward County supervisor of elections, speaks with officials before a canvassing board meeting Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, in Lauderhill, Fla. (AP Photo/Joe Skipper)

The Rest…HERE

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