Hurricane Nate weakens to tropical storm after making second landfall in Mississippi and now has diminished wind speeds of 70mph as it moves inland toward Appalachia

Sunday, October 8, 2017
By Paul Martin

Hurricane Nate made its second landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi on Saturday night after missing New Orleans
The fast-moving former hurricane had been expected to rapidly weaken as it moved inland, and has done so
Maximum winds quickly diminished to 70mph after hurricane weakening to a tropical storm early on Sunday
Nate made its initial landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi river on Saturday evening
It brought at least 10 inches of rain to the region and was expected to trigger flash flooding, 11ft storm surges
The hurricane warning for New Orleans had been changed to a tropical storm warning on Saturday
The city erected flood gates on Saturday in anticipation of the storm as thundered through the Gulf of Mexico
Hurricane warnings and evacuation orders were in place along the Gulf Coast in anticipation of the storm
Storm center expected to move across Deep South and central Appalachian Mountains through Monday

By JENNIFER SMITH and ARIEL ZILBER
DAILYMAIL.COM
8 October 2017

Tropical Storm Nate swept ashore in Mississippi on Sunday with strong winds rattling the doors of Biloxi’s many casinos and lashing rain flooding the gambling floors and surrounding highways.

The fast-moving former hurricane had been expected to rapidly weaken as it moved inland.

As maximum winds quickly diminished to 70mph after weakening to a tropical storm early on Sunday, Nate appeared to lack the devastating punch of its predecessors.

The fourth major storm to strike the United States in less than two months, Nate killed at least 30 people in Central America before entering the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico and bearing down on the U.S. South.

It has also shut down most oil and gas production in the Gulf.

The center of the storm will move across the Deep South, Tennessee Valley and central Appalachian Mountains through Monday.

Nate follows a succession of big Atlantic hurricanes, Harvey, Irma and Maria, which have devastated areas of the Caribbean and southern United States in the last two months.

The storm’s center will move inland over Mississippi and across the deep south, Tennessee Valley and Central Appalachian Mountains through Monday, the National Hurricane Center said.

Before then, storm surges of up to 11 feet on the Mississippi-Alabama border were possible, the NHC said.

Nate made its initial landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi river on Saturday evening and then made a second landfall early on Sunday near Biloxi, Mississippi, where its 46,000 residents were warned that the highest storm surge could reach 11 to 12 feet.

The storm surge brought flood waters over Highway 90 and up to oceanside casinos in Biloxi, while flood waters swept over streets in communities across Mississippi and Alabama, according to reports on social media.

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