Clinton Cash: Dina Powell Partnered with Clinton Foundation for Goldman Sachs Globalist Initiative

Thursday, September 7, 2017
By Paul Martin

by AARON KLEIN
BreitBart.com
7 Sep 2017

NEW YORK — When she served as president of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Wall Street giant, White House Deputy National Security Adviser Dina Habib Powell repeatedly partnered with the Clinton Global Initiative for a globalist women’s project that served as the centerpiece of Goldman’s charitable foundation.

Besides partnership with CGI, Powell’s foundation also directly funded the Clinton Foundation and partnered with Hillary Clinton’s State Department. Powell herself was associated with numerous groups and projects linked to the Clintons.

Powell served as president of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, where she ran the foundation’s projects after Goldman Sachs was implicated in the 2007-2008 financial crisis and sought to resurrect its shattered image.

The Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) was founded by Bill Clinton in 2005 as a part of the controversial Clinton Foundation. CGI was co-founded by Doug Band, co-founder and president of Teneo Holdings. Powell’s now ex-husband, Richard C. Powell, is president of Teneo Strategy, an arm of Band’s Teneo Holdings.

Powell, an Egyptian-American, reportedly received a salary of $2 million per year from Goldman Sachs. Her financial disclosure form from this year reveals salary, benefits, cash bonuses and equity from Goldman Sachs totaling $6,128,950.

As head of the Goldman Sachs Foundation, she specifically oversaw two major charitable initiatives, one called 10,000 Women and another named 10,000 Small Businesses. 10,000 Women aims to provide at least that number of women around the world with a business and management education to further economic opportunities and global financial growth. 10,000 Businesses, according to Powell’s Goldman bio, “provides small business owners in the US and UK with business education and access to capital.”

The projects were widely viewed as Goldman’s efforts to resurrect its tarnished image after the firm was accused of unsound practices that allegedly helped precipitate the financial crisis. “Engaging wasn’t just the right thing, it was necessary, especially in the wake of the financial crisis when people said we weren’t doing enough,” John F.W. Rogers, Goldman Sachs’ chief of staff, told the New York Times of the company’s charitable efforts.

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