Microchipping Humans: First They Traded Freedom for Security, Now It’s Privacy for Convenience

Sunday, August 6, 2017
By Paul Martin

RFID chips are in the news again, this time as employees volunteer for implants — but the chips’ convenience lures more to implants before the impact on rights can be assessed.

By Claire Bernish
TheFreeThoughtProject.com
August 6, 2017

If a steel truth exists in decades of technological innovation, it rests firmly in the convenience provided society — indeed, while the mother of invention had long been named necessity, a prodigious marketplace bolstered iniquitously by acceptance of planned obsolescence ensured materialism had supplanted anything honorable as the true American Way.

Whether society’s placating soma of an obsession with stuff and things was engineered by the political upper echelons or fell, in some nightmarish fluke, at the feet of frothy-mouthed surveillance hawks, perhaps matters not an iota, considering the State probably has more eyes in your home than does your family.

That — implanting appliances, phones, electronics, homes, cars, kids’ toys, and damned near any other objects pervertible for domestic spying — takes gall.

Like well-oiled cogs, however, even corporate media’s condemnation in headlines of the aforementioned abhorrent surveillance programs exposed by a series of tremendously important leaks and leakers, could not sway consumerists, on the whole, to raise as much as an eyebrow. Why this stupefying apathy to multitudinous rights violations perpetrated by the United States government against, well, the planet?

Convenience.

If America traded liberty for security, it chucked privacy for convenience — to our steep detriment and the State’s undoubted joy. Voice and typed internet searches on any device, putatively private chat conversations on social media, and the ever-popular, dual-facing camera — to most consumers, these and more are mere modern amenities — vast leaps forward in speed and quality and luxury and so on, ad infinitum.

Privacy and constitutional rights law can’t keep pace with invention in this digital age, leaving advancements open to abuse by both the surveillance and police states — as well as a predictable tangle of precedent-setting court cases, each breaking as much ground as the technologies they debate.

One technological wolf-in-sheep’s-clothing slipped unobtrusively into Europe as an apparent answer to accessibility in the workplace: RFID chips — grain-of-rice-sized, injectable, memory-packed, protean implants — designed to identify the bearer for use of equipment, purchases, logins, and other operations generally requiring more than the wave of one’s implant.

Once workers took the plunge, RFID (radio frequency identification) technology sprang up in a smattering of places; and, soon, Sweden accepted microchips for payment at government-run train stations — as if subcutaneous tech were well-rooted and time-tested.

The Rest…HERE

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