DEA Scans Travel Data To Seize Cash; Vague Profile That Could Be Anyone: “Good Agents Chase Cash”

Thursday, August 11, 2016
By Paul Martin

Mac Slavo
August 11th, 2016
SHTFplan.com

Think the police state isn’t catching up to us all?

Just better hope that nothing happens to you, even if you aren’t doing anything wrong… because authorities are now combing through travel data and flagging anyone who might be carrying cash.

They want the cash, and the DEA say they are targeting couriers for drug money, but in most cases simply seizing cash and release suspects without charge.

As USA Today reported:

Federal drug agents regularly mine Americans’ travel information to profile people who might be ferrying money for narcotics traffickers — though they almost never use what they learn to make arrests or build criminal cases.

Instead, that targeting has helped the Drug Enforcement Administration seize a small fortune in cash.

DEA agents have profiled passengers on Amtrak trains and nearly every major U.S. airline, drawing on reports from a network of travel-industry informants that extends from ticket counters to back offices, a USA TODAY investigation has found. Agents assigned to airports and train stations singled out passengers for questioning or searches for reasons as seemingly benign as traveling one-way to California or having paid for a ticket in cash.

The DEA surveillance is separate from the vast and widely-known anti-terrorism apparatus that now surrounds air travel, which is rarely used for routine law enforcement. It has been carried out largely without the airlines’ knowledge.

It is a lucrative endeavor, and one that remains largely unknown outside the drug agency. DEA units assigned to patrol 15 of the nation’s busiest airports seized more than $209 million in cash from at least 5,200 people over the past decade after concluding the money was linked to drug trafficking, according to Justice Department records. Most of the money was passed on to local police departments that lend officers to assist the drug agency.

“They count on this as part of the budget,” said Louis Weiss, a former supervisor of the DEA group assigned to Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. “Basically, you’ve got to feed the monster.”

The Rest…HERE

Leave a Reply